Toxic Mold May Be Contaminating Your Home

Stachybotrys chartarum

I heard about “toxic molds” that grow in homes. Should I be concerned about a serious health risk to me and my family?

The term “toxic mold” is not really accurate. While certain molds are toxigenic, meaning they can produce toxins (specifically mycotoxins), the molds themselves are not toxic, or poisonous. Hazards presented by molds that may produce mycotoxins should be considered the same as other common molds which can grow in your house. There is always a little mold everywhere – in the air and on many surfaces. There are very few reports that toxigenic molds found inside homes can cause unique or rare health conditions such as pulmonary hemorrhage or memory loss. These case reports are rare, and a causal link between the presence of the toxigenic mold and these conditions has not been proven.
 
In 2004 the Institute of Medicine (IOM) found there was sufficient evidence to link indoor exposure to mold with upper respiratory tract symptoms, cough, and wheeze in otherwise healthy people; with asthma symptoms in people with asthma; and with hypersensitivity pneumonitis in individuals susceptible to that immune-mediated condition. The IOM also found limited or suggestive evidence linking indoor mold exposure and respiratory illness in otherwise healthy children. In 2009, the World Health Organization issued additional guidance, the WHO Guidelines for Indoor Air Quality: Dampness and Mould. Other recent studies have suggested a potential link of early mold exposure to development of asthma in some children, particularly among children who may be genetically susceptible to asthma development, and that selected interventions that improve housing conditions can reduce morbidity from asthma and respiratory allergies, but more research is needed in this regard.
 
A common-sense approach should be used for any mold contamination existing inside buildings and homes. The common health concerns from molds include hay fever-like allergic symptoms. Certain individuals with chronic respiratory disease (chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder, asthma) may experience difficulty breathing. Individuals with immune suppression may be at increased risk for infection from molds. If you or your family members have these conditions, a qualified medical clinician should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment. For the most part, one should take routine measures to prevent mold growth in the home.
 

How common is mold, including Stachybotrys chartarum (also known as Stachybotrys atra) in homes?

Molds are very common in buildings and homes and will grow anywhere indoors where there is moisture. The most common indoor molds are Cladosporium, Penicillium, Aspergillus, and Alternaria. We do not have precise information about how often Stachybotrys chartarum is found in buildings and homes. While it is less common than other mold species, it is not rare.
 

What is Stachybotrys chartarum (Stachybotrys atra)?

Stachybotrys chartarum (also known by its synonym Stachybotrys atra) is a greenish-black mold. It can grow on material with a high cellulose and low nitrogen content, such as fiberboard, gypsum board, paper, dust, and lint. Growth occurs when there is moisture from water damage, excessive humidity, water leaks, condensation, water infiltration, or flooding. Constant moisture is required for its growth. It is not necessary, however, to determine what type of mold you may have. All molds should be treated the same with respect to potential health risks and removal.
 

Does Stachybotrys chartarum (Stachybotrys atra) cause acute idiopathic pulmonary hemorrhage among infants?

To date, a possible association between acute idiopathic pulmonary hemorrhage among infants and Stachybotrys chartarum (Stachybotrys atra) has not been proved. Further studies are needed to determine what causes acute idiopathic hemorrhage.
 

How do you keep mold out of buildings and homes?

As part of routine building maintenance, buildings should be inspected for evidence of water damage and visible mold. The conditions causing mold (such as water leaks, condensation, infiltration, or flooding) should be corrected to prevent mold from growing.

Specific Recommendations:

  • Keep humidity levels as low as you can—no higher than 50%–all day long. An air conditioner or dehumidifier will help you keep the level low. Bear in mind that humidity levels change over the course of a day with changes in the moisture in the air and the air temperature, so you will need to check the humidity levels more than once a day.
  • Use air conditioner or a dehumidifier during humid months.
  • Be sure the home has adequate ventilation, including exhaust fans in kitchen and bathrooms.
  • Use mold inhibitors which can be added to paints.
  • Clean bathroom with mold-killing products.
  • Do not carpet bathrooms.
  • Remove and replace flooded carpets.

 

About Author: Jim Mullen
With over 31 years in Residential Construction, Design, and Inspections and owning my construction business for over 27 years, I still learn something new each and every day. I enjoy passing my knowledge on to those who are interested, and always welcome a challenge. If you have any questions about residential building and maintenance, I welcome you to just ask. "An educated consumer is our best customer"

1 thought(s) on “Toxic Mold May Be Contaminating Your Home

  • Molds are a piece of the nature. In outside, molds have paramount impact in nature by breaking down dead natural matter, for example, fallen leaves and dead trees, and so forth. Anyway inside, mold development ought to be evaded and anticipated. Molds repeat by method for small spores; the spores are concealed to the exposed eye (just on magnifying lens) and buoy through open air and indoor air and sully zones. Mold may start to develop inside when mold spores arrive on surfaces that are wet or zones with dampness. There are numerous sorts of mold, and none of them will develop without water or dampness. Thus, dampness has extraordinary influence of it.
    They assault for the most part on sustenance yet they likewise strike non-nourishment things like cowhide, wood and porcelain. Do you recognize your hypersensitive responses are more regrettable when you’re at home however you feel better when you go out? All things considered, need it. If so then it’s particularly likely you could have mold. Don’t go tired of staying in one spot. Discover a path for mold detection

Leave a Reply

Subscribe to Blog via Email

Join 1,613 other subscribers

%d bloggers like this: